thetasteofawesome:

Supposed To Be 45 Mph http://bit.ly/1a4IfpQ

thetasteofawesome:

Supposed To Be 45 Mph http://bit.ly/1a4IfpQ

tastefullyoffensive:

[calmblueoceans]

Somehow

Somehow, I think I’ve actually discovered my own version of a zen state. 

It isn’t the kind of zen where one empties their mind of all thoughts and reaches a oneness with the universe that sounds really silly. More of a kind of internal peace where I feel that many of the chains that I feel are tying me down are somewhat lighter. 

In a way, it’s a feeling of lightness that somehow gives me, even if it’s just a little bit, a bit more optimism for things to come. Not the kind of induced optimism for the sake of example or fear that I usually employ which is vehemently half-hearted. But a kind of optimism that actually feels genuine. A relaxed feeling of optimism.

In contrast though, it’s still a huge clusterfuck of thoughts, ideas, discourses and whatnot but in a way, it doesn’t make me feel pathetic or lacking. It’s a soothing feeling that at least makes me feel a little bit better. 

I don’t know if it’s just the lighter workload I have now or possibly even because of the subjects that I take now. But I know for a fact that this new state of mine which in many ways is far superior even to one of my insanely happy states in the past is rooted in a kind of understanding of things. Which I’m happy that I understand now. 

techhive:

The worlds first 3D-printed battery is beyond tiny, could power future gadgets
Don’t expect this sort of thing to power, you know, your phone. This is micro-scale stuff.

techhive:

The worlds first 3D-printed battery is beyond tiny, could power future gadgets

Don’t expect this sort of thing to power, you know, your phone. This is micro-scale stuff.

Technology is neither good nor bad. But it does make people’s good and bad more powerful.

- Yishan Wong of reddit in Kevin Kelly’s article “Dreams” in 5/2013 issue of WIRED magazine (via nwroth)

science-junkie:

A Big Step Toward a Silicon Quantum ComputerQuantum computers could more easily become a reality if they incorporated the silicon semiconductor processing used by the modern electronics industry. Physicists in Australia have recently taken a new step toward that vision by reading and writing the nuclear spin state of a single phosphorus atom implanted in silicon.In a breakthrough reported in the 18 April edition of the journal Nature, physicists have finally achieved an idea first proposed in 1998 by Bruce Kane, a physicist at the University of Maryland, in College Park. Such success could lead to quantum computers based on the same silicon-processing technology used for computer chips.“What we are trying to do is demonstrate that there is a viable way to take the same physical platform and fabrication technology used to make any computer and mobile phone in the world, and twist it into a technology for quantum information processing,” says Andrea Morello, a quantum physicist at the University of New South Wales, in Australia.Scientists envision quantum computers as the ideal devices for cracking modern encryption codes, searching through huge databases, and understanding the biological interactions of molecules and drugs. Quantum computing’s potential comes from harnessing the laws of quantum physics that allow the spin state of an electron or an atom’s nucleus to achieve “superposition”—existing in more than one state at a time. A classical computer bit can exist either as a 1 or a 0, but a quantum bit, or qubit, is capable of existing in multiple states at the same time.With other quantum computing approaches, researchers have tried trapping and isolating atoms by using electromagnetic fields or superconductor materials. By comparison, Kane suggested harnessing the nuclear spin of phosphorus atoms embedded in a silicon crystal as a qubit.Silicon-based quantum computing also offers long coherence times for electron and nuclear spins, Kane says. That means the electron spin states and nuclear spin states acting as qubits could hold on to their information for long periods of time, something that other quantum computing schemes have struggled with.
Read more.

science-junkie:

A Big Step Toward a Silicon Quantum Computer

Quantum computers could more easily become a reality if they incorporated the silicon semiconductor processing used by the modern electronics industry. Physicists in Australia have recently taken a new step toward that vision by reading and writing the nuclear spin state of a single phosphorus atom implanted in silicon.

In a breakthrough reported in the 18 April edition of the journal Nature, physicists have finally achieved an idea first proposed in 1998 by Bruce Kane, a physicist at the University of Maryland, in College Park. Such success could lead to quantum computers based on the same silicon-processing technology used for computer chips.

“What we are trying to do is demonstrate that there is a viable way to take the same physical platform and fabrication technology used to make any computer and mobile phone in the world, and twist it into a technology for quantum information processing,” says Andrea Morello, a quantum physicist at the University of New South Wales, in Australia.

Scientists envision quantum computers as the ideal devices for cracking modern encryption codes, searching through huge databases, and understanding the biological interactions of molecules and drugs. Quantum computing’s potential comes from harnessing the laws of quantum physics that allow the spin state of an electron or an atom’s nucleus to achieve “superposition”—existing in more than one state at a time. A classical computer bit can exist either as a 1 or a 0, but a quantum bit, or qubit, is capable of existing in multiple states at the same time.

With other quantum computing approaches, researchers have tried trapping and isolating atoms by using electromagnetic fields or superconductor materials. By comparison, Kane suggested harnessing the nuclear spin of phosphorus atoms embedded in a silicon crystal as a qubit.

Silicon-based quantum computing also offers long coherence times for electron and nuclear spins, Kane says. That means the electron spin states and nuclear spin states acting as qubits could hold on to their information for long periods of time, something that other quantum computing schemes have struggled with.

Read more.

9gag:

People wearing google glasses

9gag:

People wearing google glasses

9gag:

Sunken Observation Platform (Vöcklabruck, Austria)

9gag:

Sunken Observation Platform (Vöcklabruck, Austria)

MDL十九歳.

Chem Major.

Overthinker.

Forever analyzing the arcade of existence.